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Segmentation of binaural room impulse responses for speech intelligibility prediction
Citation key Kokabi.2018
Author Kokabi, Omid and Brinkmann, Fabian and Weinzierl, Stefan
Pages 2793
Year 2018
DOI 10.1121/1.5078598
Journal The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
Volume 144
Number 5
Abstract The two most important aspects in binaural speech perception-better-ear-listening and spatial-release-from-masking-can be predicted well with current binaural modeling frameworks operating on head-related impulse responses, i.e., anechoic binaural signals. To incorporate effects of reverberation, a model extension was proposed, splitting binaural room impulse responses into an early, useful, and late, detrimental part, before being fed into the modeling framework. More recently, an interaction between the applied splitting time, room properties, and the resulting prediction accuracy was observed. This interaction was investigated here by measuring speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in quiet with 18 normal-hearing subjects for four simulated rooms with different reverberation times and a constant room geometry. The mean error with one of the most promising binaural prediction models could be reduced by about 1 dB by adapting the applied splitting time to room acoustic parameters. This improvement in prediction accuracy can make up a difference of 17% in absolute intelligibility within the applied SRT measurement paradigm. The two most important aspects in binaural speech perception-better-ear-listening and spatial-release-from-masking-can be predicted well with current binaural modeling frameworks operating on head-related impulse responses, i.e., anechoic binaural signals. To incorporate effects of reverberation, a model extension was proposed, splitting binaural room impulse responses into an early, useful, and late, detrimental part, before being fed into the modeling framework. More recently, an interaction between the applied splitting time, room properties, and the resulting prediction accuracy was observed. This interaction was investigated here by measuring speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in quiet with 18 normal-hearing subjects for four simulated rooms with different reverberation times and a constant room geometry. The mean error with one of the most promising binaural prediction models could be reduced by about 1 dB by adapting the applied splitting time to room acoustic parameters. This improvement in prediction accuracy can make up a difference of 17% in absolute intelligibility within the applied SRT measurement paradigm. // The two most important aspects in binaural speech perception-better-ear-listening and spatial-release-from-masking-can be predicted well with current binaural modeling frameworks operating on head-related impulse responses, i.e., anechoic binaural signals. To incorporate effects of reverberation, a model extension was proposed, splitting binaural room impulse responses into an early, useful, and late, detrimental part, before being fed into the modeling framework. More recently, an interaction between the applied splitting time, room properties, and the resulting prediction accuracy was observed. This interaction was investigated here by measuring speech reception thresholds (SRTs) in quiet with 18 normal-hearing subjects for four simulated rooms with different reverberation times and a constant room geometry. The mean error with one of the most promising binaural prediction models could be reduced by about 1 dB by adapting the applied splitting time to room acoustic parameters. This improvement in prediction accuracy can make up a difference of 17% in absolute intelligibility within the applied SRT measurement paradigm.
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